The Dingle Angle Tuning

A space for players interested in my specialist harmonicas, alternate tunings, instructional material, recordings etc to ask questions and share information, experiences, videos etc.
Paris
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The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by Paris » Thu May 24, 2018 4:40 am

The first time I heard this song, I knew I had to learn it! So, being a PowerBender convert I grabbed my A harp and set out to learning this awesome tune! Parts of the melody proved to be rather tricky to execute on PowerBender, but definitely playable with a little practice. Then I was testing out a new Manji A harp in richter the other night and I realized that the main Dingle Angle lick is quite a bit smoother to play on Richter.

So Brendan, just wondering which tuning you used on this tune??

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triona
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Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by triona » Thu May 24, 2018 1:56 pm

Hihihi ... It's not all times that any special tuning works out best.
For some tunes just a simple Richter will do best. ;)
It's not to forget about amidst all the fine new stuff anyway.
And at least - the Richters all of us most probably have on-hand in all keys - or at least in most of the common ones. 8-)


dear greetings
triona
Aw, Thou beloved, do hearken to the Banshee's lonely croon!
sinn féin - ça ira !
Cad é sin do'n té sin nach mbaineann sin dó


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1yI3H ... 9ktgzTR2qg

Lizzy
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Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by Lizzy » Thu May 24, 2018 7:21 pm

I have a similar experience in two ways. I was converting one of my old solos from Richter to Powerbender and some notes now became blow notes with Powerbender. Nothing wrong with that but i noticed that my solo now sounded much softer because i could not attack or bend those blow notes i used to do on the draw notes on Richter. So it did sound weaker in some way. But i have also converted solos from Powerbender to Richter and experienced it similar.

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triona
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Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by triona » Thu May 24, 2018 8:21 pm

Just what I wanted to say.
There are really good reasons for both of it. Just depending on the tune, the rhythm, the genre, the personal style and whatever else.

And every time I have tested and practised a new tuning or a new type of harp excessively, I return to others for those purposes, where the old ones on which I used to play it before were suited better. You will learn very soon, what is working out better.


dear greetings
triona
Aw, Thou beloved, do hearken to the Banshee's lonely croon!
sinn féin - ça ira !
Cad é sin do'n té sin nach mbaineann sin dó


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1yI3H ... 9ktgzTR2qg

Lizzy
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Joined: Sun May 07, 2017 1:42 pm
Location: Sweden

Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by Lizzy » Sat May 26, 2018 9:56 pm

But to me it only occurs when i transcribe riffs, solos, songs (for harmonica) that first was created with a Richter tuning. All my own solos/accompany that first was created with powerbender tuning is many times made to suit my playing style/expressions and is rarely reversible to any advantage to Richter.

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Brendan
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Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by Brendan » Mon May 28, 2018 2:42 am

I recorded 'The Dingle Angle' with a tuning I used for about 15 years and on many albums, called PowerBlow tuning.

After starting with Richter, in about 1980 I made a batch of 11-hole harps with a tuning with an even breathing pattern that was reflected in its name:

Regular-Breath Tuning
CD. EG. GB. CD. EF# GA. AB. CD. EF# GA. BC

You can see Regular-Breath is the same as PowerChromatic Tuning from holes 4-10, and I used pure PC on chromatics from about 1980. Regular-Breath was great for melodic Bluegrass type of playing, but I wanted something more bluesy.

PowerBlow returns to the reversed upper octave breathing pattern of Richter, but changes the notes so the high blow bends come out in cross harp.

PowerBlow Tuning
CD. EG. GB. DC. EF. GA. BA. DC. GE. CA

Its a soulful blues tuning with great high blow bends, but that reversed breathing pattern started to bug me more and more, and I decided to change again to a regular breath tuning. In about 2006 I created PowerDraw and PowerBender tunings. The top octave of PowerDraw is a mirror image of PowerBlow:

CD. EG. GB. CD. EF. GA. AB. CD. EG. AC

PowerDraw allowed me to play all the tunes and licks I'd developed in PowerBlow with the same feeling but opposite breath. So these days I play 'The Dingle Angle' using PowerDraw, and it comes out virtually identical.

But I liked the easier chromaticism of that original Regular-Breath Tuning from 1980, and in PowerBender I got a good blend of it with the top end of PowerDraw. PB has been my main diatonic tuning for about 10 years now.

PowerBender Tuning
CD. EG. GB. CD. DE. FG. AB. CD. EG. AC

However for certain tunes PowerDraw is better, 'The Dingle Angle' being one. I still have a few harps in PowerBlow but don't use them anymore.

Paris
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Location: Santa rosa, CA

Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by Paris » Mon May 28, 2018 5:04 am

Thank-you for the detailed response Brendan! I find the progression of your tunings fascinating. When I came across your playing and PB/PC tunings it was like I had discovered new instruments full of new sounds!! Very exhilerating!

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Brendan
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Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by Brendan » Tue May 29, 2018 7:56 am

Thanks Paris, glad you're enjoying exploring them :-) As you say, a different tuning transforms the instrument completely, and opens up all kinds of new expression and musical possibilities.

But it can be a big step to either add a new tuning to your repertoire, or switch entirely from an old one. All that muscle memory is hard to overcome, and for some time you'll find yourself making mistakes as you unconsciously follow old breath/mouth patterns that are no longer correct.

Then there's the mission and expense of either retuning old harps or buying more for the new tuning. Anyone who plays diatonic seriously will have at least twelve to attend to, and probably more. I've been through the mass-retuning process several times in my career, and it's always a big mission to contemplate.

Once I've made the decision to change I just take a deep breath and give myself a few solid days in the workshop to do the retuning work. In my case it extends to multiple chromatics too! It can be quite daunting even for someone like me, wlho works on harps all the time. For those who don't it's either very expensive or a deal-breaker: they might want to change but can't face the hassle or expense involved.

One recent alternative solution to all this is the DM48 Midi harmonica. It has 12 tuning slots, and all of those can be played in any key. I've stored all my favourite tunings in mine, and can switch between them quickly. No retuning, no reeds to break or fine tune, and all your tunings in one instrument. Pretty attractive!

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Brendan
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Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by Brendan » Tue May 29, 2018 8:08 am

Getting back to 'The Dingle Angle' tuning:

When I wrote the big spiel on it earlier, I had a serious case of brain fade! I mixed up that tune with another in my mind, '20 Out of 10'. It's on the same album (Tradish), and is one that uses the entire range of the harp - hence the name (which has the double meaning of giving double points for a fine tune :-)

Originally composed on PowerBlow, it works well in PowerDraw too, which is how I play it now.

As for 'The Dingle Angle', the main melody parts could be played on a normal Richter harp, since they only go up to 6 draw. PowerBlow is pure Richter up to there. The solo part is characteristic of PowerBlow, but will work well on PowerDraw too.

I did try it on PowerBender: it works but doesn't have the same easy swing. So the main thrust of what I said remains relevant, even though I was thinking of another tune entirely!

Paris
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri May 26, 2017 2:18 am
Location: Santa rosa, CA

Re: The Dingle Angle Tuning

Post by Paris » Wed May 30, 2018 6:38 am

Indeed, since I discovered your music and methods I have perhaps spent more money than I should filling my modest harp case with a cx-12, two scx-48s and a scx-56. And then there's the constantly rotating line-up of diatonics in most of the 12 keys AND your outstanding set of LUCKY 13's! I've put my chromatics in PC and all my diatonics in PB and Half Valve everything.

I quickly started collecting many tools to maintain these harps: soldering iron, dremel, drill press, a host of hand tools, and a lifetime supply of Blu-Tack!! A miniature workshop. While I enjoy the finished product more than the process, Half-valving and re-tuning my harps has become as important to me as practicing. In high school I played diatonics for fun and in college I played a stock chromatic in a Latin Jazz Band. Loved it but always missed the bends on chromatic and hated the top octave of richter. Your tunings boast many advantages, but primarily they fix these two issues!

I had never realized that major advantage of the DM48. Something to seriously consider. I wonder how much one might spend for such a sleek set up???

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